Womans Day Australia – November 27 2017

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The State of Gender Equality in Australia on International Womens Day What more needs to happen? (2011

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The State of Gender Equality in Australia on International Womens Day: What more needs to happen? (2011)

The State of Gender Equality in Australia on International Womens Day: What more needs to happen? (2011)

Elizabeth Broderick, Sex Discrimination Commissioner

on International Womens Day: What more needs to happen?Speech by Elizabeth Broderick

Sex Discrimination Commissioner and Commissioner responsible for Age Discrimination, Australian Human Rights CommissionGender Equity SummitAustralian Human Resources Institute

I am delighted to be with you to mark the 100thyear of International Womens Day.

Before I begin today I would like to thank Michael West for his generous welcome to country this morning and also pay my deepest respects to the traditional owners of this land – the Gadigal people of the Eora nation and the elders, both past and present.

I would like to congratulate AHRI for incorporating the traditional Welcome to Country ceremony as part of their program today. This is the first time that AHRI have included a Welcome to Country ceremony.

By having a welcome to country and acknowledging the traditional owners, we acknowledge the unique position of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the life of our nation. This is reconciliation in action.

I would also like to acknowledge the talented Aboriginal women in the corporate sector. I have had the pleasure of meeting and working with a number of them.

On the 8thof March, 100 years ago, 15,000 women textile workers marched through New York City demanding shorter hours, better pay, voting rights and an end to child labour. Their sweatshop style working conditions were tragically highlighted three years later, when a fire broke out at the Triangle Shirtwaist Companys factory in New York City. The exits were locked from the outside to prevent workers taking breaks or stealing materials. The fire caused the death of 146 mostly young immigrant women and children who were either trapped in the burning building or leapt to their deaths.

That same year more than one million European women and men rallied for womens rights on the first official International Womens Day.

Today, 100 years later, International Womens Day is celebrated around the world.

The first Australian rally for International Womens Day took place in Sydneys Domain on March 25, 1928. Back then, women were calling for equal pay for equal work; an 8 hour day for shop workers; a ban on piece work; a basic wage for the unemployed and annual holidays on full pay. These dont seem like radical demands but even today there are many working women who cannot lay claim to any of them. This is not to say that the situation for women has not improved over the past 100 years – it has – and it is worth spending some time, particularly today, to remember and celebrate that.

100 years ago Australian women finally won the right to vote in all State and Commonwealth elections, although Indigenous women had to wait another 57 years for the same right.

But even with the right to vote, women were not represented in Australias state parliaments until 1921. And it was not until 1943 that women were elected to our federal parliament for the first time.

Well into the 1960s Australian women in the public service were forced to resign from their jobs as permanent officers if they got married. It was the same in many private companies.

It was only in 1965 that Australian women won the right to drink in a public bar. On a Wednesday afternoon in March that year, two women, Merle Thornton and Rosalie Bognor, entered the public bar of the Regatta Hotel in Brisbane and ordered two beers. When they were refused their beers and asked to leave, they promptly chained themselves to the footrail of the bar.

This was part of the Womens Liberation movement which started in the 1960s. The aim of the movement was not to have it all as some contemporaries would have us believe. It was among other things to transform thepower relations between men and women that lay at the foundation of our society.

In the early 1990s we started to see women and men looking at how each could play a role to bring about gender equality. Young DIY feminists took the concept of men and women as equals as a given and applied it in both their professional and personal lives. Their focus was on individual practices and personal challenges rather than identification with a broader womens movement. Rejecting the notion of women as victims, many of these women did not identify as feminists even though they advocated for their own rights. This is where we are today.

When I think about my own life, I went to university, and when my children were born I was able to work as a partner in a large law firm three days a week. Now I am a federal Commissioner and a mum with two young children. I never let myself forget that this would not have been possible but for a strong womens movement and strong gender equality laws.

Today also gives us an opportunity to identify areas where we have not seen sufficient progress, to reflect on the reasons for this and to decide what we will do.

So today I want to highlight four areas where there is still much to do – pay equity, womens leadership, sexual harassment and violence against women.

Pay equity: 100 Years after women first marched in the streets demanding equal pay and four decades after the first Federal pay case, the gender gap still exists in Australian workplaces. Even more alarming is that, over the last four years. The gender gap in pay has actually widened to 17 per cent[1].

The opportunity for progress has come in the form of the Australian Services Unions test case in Fair Work Australia, which seeks to address lower pay among female-dominated community sector workers. If this application succeeds it will be a major advance for the women who carry out this important work. And it will have a flow-on impact. There is concern about how any increase will be funded. But I think whether community sector work is undervalued and how any increase should be funded are 2 separate questions.

Pay inequality is not limited to female-dominated industries. It is also particularly pronounced in ASX200 companies. Among the key management personnel in these companies, the pay gap is 28.3% – more than 10% higher than the current national average pay gap[2].

The corporate world operates with the view that people who are paid more, matter more. They have greater influence about decisions and are more important. So the very existence of the pay gap further marginalises women and is an added burden. Not only are women paid less but they are perceived to be less valuable.

Recently, a male CEO told me about an initiative in his organisation to examine all salary recommendations through a gender lens. He has formed a high level team which works with business units to identify any gender pay gap. This high level team has the authority to override any manager where the explanation for the pay gap is not compelling – a great example of what can be done.

Pay inequality exists because we allow it to. A concerted effort by business, government and the community is needed to close this gap. I have also recommended that a National Pay Equity Strategy be put in place to comprehensively address this issue.

100 years after women marched in the street demanding equal pay, its time to deliver.

Despite Australia having a female Governor-General, a female Prime Minister and several female state and territory premiers and governors, the second area where there has been insufficient progress is in womens under-representation at decision making levels.

As you will know we started 2010 with the top 200 boardrooms languishing with only 8.4% of female directors. Movement had been glacial over the previous eight years. From 2002 to 2010 we increased the number of women on boards by a mere 0.2%[3].

It took some of the finest statisticians in the land to prove there had been any movement at all. And that was after 5 revisions.

So why should we care whether women are represented on boards and at senior leadership level – because there is a strong correlation between improved corporate performance and greater gender diversity at senior levels.

And the good news is that with your help, and I know many people in this room have been personally involved – change is happening. In the past year there has been an almost 600% uplift in the number of women appointed to ASX boards so that we now have over 11% of board directorships on ASX200 companies held by women[4]. 600% sounds a lot. The actual numbers are quite small (10 women in 2009 versus 59 in 2010[5]) but the strong message is that weve turned the corner and were on our way.

Have the board standards been lowered to accommodate women? I think youll agree not. Women such as Carol Schwartz, Catherine Brenner, Alison Watkins, Belinda Hutchinson, Sam Mostyn, Ilana Atlas, Christine McLoughlin, Yasmin Allen and 50 other talented and impressive women have received new appointments.

Will the changes become entrenched? That is a question I cannot answer but I fear that without significant cultural change we will slip backwards again.

Targets, or dare I say it, quotas may deliver greater gender equity on boards but they may have limited impact on increasing the number of women in executive line management roles from the existing 4%[6]. This is one of the documented failures of the Norwegian quota system. Avivah Wittenberg-Cox a noted gender consultant puts it this way:

There is massive corporate mis-adaptation to todays talent realities and the subsequent inability to retain and develop women as well as men. I call this gender asbestos. Its hidden in the walls, cultures and mindsets of many organisations. But ridding the structure of these cultural toxins will require more than pointing accusingly at the mess. It requires a detailed plan for how to move forward and a compelling, attractive portrait of the result. Stop asking Whats wrong with women that theyre not making it to the top? Start asking Whats wrong with companies if they cant retain and promote the majority of educated [people]?

There is no question that addressing the issue of women at senior management rather than board level is a more complex issue. Over the years there have been many programs, strategies and interventions to do just this but we just dont seem to be making progress. The sense I have from travelling around Australia is that there is frustration and anger at the slow pace of change, particularly at the senior management level. I look forward to the panel discussions today to identify what more we must do.

My third topic has galvanised not just boardrooms but the nation over many months sexual harassment.

For those of you who missed the media hype its not too late. I understand that there are workshops on the lessons learnt from the Mark McInnes and Kirsty Fraser Kirk case.

Ordinarily sexual harassment claims proceed either to the Australian Human Rights Commission for conciliation or a state based equal opportunity commission. If a successful conciliation is not possible, the complaint is terminated and a small number of usually well funded complainants then bring proceedings in the federal court. But this case travelled an unusual route. In this case, the first port of call was the Federal Court, based on alleged breaches of the Trade Practices Act and the employment contract. Not only that, but the individual board directors were personally named in the pleadings.

The claim raised many important issues regarding the extent of a boards role in operational matters and its liability to employees for representations made. It raised issues about the kind of reporting structures the board should have in place to manage these risks and to protect themselves from allegations of misleading and deceptive conduct and breach of contract?

While the high punitive damages sought in this case became the focus for many, the principal issue that needs to be on the boardroom and management agenda is the high prevalence of sexual harassment in Australia and what boards and management should be doing to prevent it.

Sexual harassment is pervasive in Australian workplaces this is despite it being prohibited under the Sex Discrimination Act for over 25 years. Our prevalence study showed three things firstly, there is high prevalence 22% of women have been sexually harassed in the workplace[7].Secondly, the low number of women making complaints. Of those who experienced sexual harassment only 16% brought any form of formal complaint[8]. Andthirdly, there is still much confusion about where work ends and personal life starts about exactly which interactions constitute sexual harassment.

My message is clear, just because youre not hearing about sexual harassment doesnt mean its not happening.

There was some suggestion that the Fraser- Kirk case may deter women from bringing complaints in the future. A review of the complaints coming into the Commission for the six months to Dec 2010 shows the exact opposite. The number of sexual harassment complaints has increased significantly as a proportion of all complaints received by the Commission under the Sex Discrimination Act. From July to December 2010 sexual harassment complaints accounted for over 30% of all complaints under the Act. This compares to 20% of all complaints under the Act in 2009.

It is interesting to see in another high profile case against a financial institution filed only recently that punitive damages were once again claimed. This case also settled prior to hearing but I have no doubt that the manner in which these claims are pleaded in the future will change.

The final area of insufficient progress is that of violence against women and particularly domestic violence.

Domestic violence is not just someone elses problem. It is not determined by how much money you have, where you come from, or how old you are.

Domestic violence – family violence – is violence which occurs in a current or former intimate relationship or family relationship, a relationship characterised by a systemic pattern of power and control.

How big is this problem? In 2005, the Personal Safety Survey showed that one in three women in Australia has experienced violence since the age 15[9]. You do the maths – thats over 3 million women[10]. Over forty percent of these women experienced violence at the hands of a current or former partner[11]. That is over 1.2 million women[12]. It doesnt end there. Each year, this violence is witnessed by over 180,000 children[13].

And we know that women from different racial backgrounds, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, migrant and refugee women and women with disability may face an even more difficult time.

Indigenous women are 45 times more likely than non-Indigenous women to be victims of domestic violence

Women with disabilities are assaulted, raped and abused at least twice as often as women without disabilities

Almost every week in Australia, one woman is killed by her current or former partner,[16]often after a history of domestic violence. Victorian research has found that domestic violence is the leading contributor to death, disability and illness in women aged 15-44 years, being a greater contributor than factors like high blood pressure, smoking or obesity[17]. And it has a financial cost. Domestic violence and sexual assault perpetrated against women cost the nation $13.6 billion per annum[18].

But before I go on, I want to stress that violence is not just an issue for women. It is also very much an issue for men. But there is a difference. Most violence against men occurs in a public place and by a stranger. The violence Im talking about today violence that is primarily directed at women – is about violence perpetrated often in ones own home, the very place that all of us should feel the most safe.

Importantly, I do not wish to typecast all men as abusers. Abusive men represent a minority. It is the majority of men who can help create a culture in which violence against women is unacceptable.

Part of the problem, I think, is that today, as in recent decades, awareness of the incidence of domestic violence is still quite low and people do not understand the patterns and the realities with which the victims have to live. And this is particularly so in Australian workplaces.

To convince you that domestic violence is also a workplace issue.

So often I go into business and talk about sexual harassment. We have an engaging and constructive conversation. But when I mention the words domestic violence I am politely told that domestic violence is a private matter. That workplaces have no role.

In business, domestic violence is the issue that dare not speak its name, where shame hangs heavily.

So let me explain why it is a business issue.

In essence, what affects employees also affects employers.

We know that almost two thirds of women who experience domestic and family violence are in paid work, so there is no question that the issue of violence affects many in our workplaces[19].

Domestic violence may result in lower performance and productivity at work, as victims struggle to put on a brave face.

It may result in frequent or prolonged absenteeism, job loss because of trauma or the need to preserve and prioritise their safety[20].

Women who experience it are more likely to have a disrupted work history, to have to change jobs and work in casual and part time work, than women with no experience of violence[21].

A study conducted by Professor Ruth Brandwein at the State University of New York, found that some abusive men use a range of tactics to try to sabotage womens work efforts.

As part of the study, a woman named Judy recounted how she lost her job as manager of a fast food outlet because of her husbands jealousy and violence.

She explained If a guy talked to me, [my husband] would rip doors off hinges he would go nuts. I left because I didnt think it was fair to [my employers][22].

Another woman named Joan described her husband hiding her clothes to prevent her from going to work. Joans husband would promise to baby-sit, but would not show up or show up early in the morning after a night of drinking.

I wouldnt leave the children with him when he was drunk, she recalled. So I went through many jobs. I got fired often. I was very embarrassed. It ate away at my self esteem.

The penalties and disruptions to a womans working life, have profound financial consequences, and the economic price that women pay is life long.

The impact for men can be profoundly debilitating too.

Recently, I was struck by a Four Corners program on mens behavioural change programs. The program followed three men who had voluntarily agreed to undertake a 28 week program to deal with their violence a courageous act which allowed them to reclaim their humanity. For two of them, the event that triggered their inclusion in the program was not the fact that they were violent at home and that their wives lived in fear, but rather that they were counselled at work and told that if their abusive behaviour toward their co-workers did not change they would be fired from the workplace.

But things are changing. Over the last six months a number of organisations both public and private sector have developed policies to support staff living with violence and to support perpetrators to change their behaviour.

Some have included an entitlement to domestic violence leave in their enterprise agreements. Others have created workplace policies to support staff by offering flexible work, special leave, the ability to change extension numbers, a bag of belongings in a safe place, the possibility of working in another office, domestic violence support information supplied with the workplace safety training at induction etc. As I mentioned in the story about the 4 Corners Program, organisations are also recognising that some employees need help to change violent and abusive behaviour. Instead of sweeping it under the carpet they are working to identify appropriate programs and assisting people to attend those programs.

Australia CEO Challenge in Queensland is an organisation breaking new ground by taking the message of domestic violence into workplaces. It would be great to see the emergence of more organisations like this all around Australia.

As Betty Taylor, a noted Australian expert and author in this area says:

The effects of domestic violence are all-pervasive. Women suffer silently and business continues losing money unawares. Business should address it not just because of the bottom line, but because it will take all sectors of society to eliminate this blight on our nation.

It is incumbent on all of us to work together to address this issue. The creation of innovative and bold workplace policies is a good starting point.

Addressing the incidence of violence against women has become an urgent priority for me. The experiences of the women I have spoken of today and the many others around Australia dictate that the issue of domestic violence can no longer be put in the too hard basket. We need action and we need it now.

Just last month the Australian, State and Territory Governments released a National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children. It is a significant step forward for Australia. Violence against women is a national problem which requires a national and local response. The plan which focuses strongly on primary prevention, building respectful relationships and working to increase gender equality is a great first step. But this is just the beginning. You can have the best plan in the world but if it is not effectively implemented and resourced then change will not happen. Business must be part of this national conversation.

Id like to finish by recounting one final story told to me by the head of one of Australias largest womens organisations. Its a story that gives me great hope that we can create a more equal future. But it requires all of us to treat this issue with the seriousness it deserves.

It is the story of a woman Ill call Ella. Ella was in her mid 70s, and had been living in an abusive relationship for around 45 years. Her daughter and grand daughter had come to stay with her and her husband.

One night, Ellas husband came home from the pub – like he always did. He had been drinking with his mates – like he always did. He walked into the kitchen and – like he always did – proceeded to hit and punch Ella. Ellas 40 yr old daughter – like she had always done – hid. But Ellas teenage grand daughter was watching from the next room. And she did something different. When her grandfather finally left she approached Ella and said:

It doesnt have to be like this, Grandma.

For the first time, someone – Ellas grand daughter – offered her a way out. She arranged to take her Grandmother to the local domestic violence counselling service the next day. And the heartening thing about this story is that finally, after 45 years, someone was asking Ella about her relationship they had given her permission to speak about her abuse.

On International Womens Day, stories like Ellas give me hope. The same hope that has seen us pull together to produce improvements in areas like paid parental leave, pay equity, womens leadership and sexual harassment. Hope that with education, awareness, advocacy and commitment we can create a world where these women, all women, have a chance at a life free from violence.

Just as everyone has a right to live free from violence, so do we all have a responsibility to reduce violence.

So on this occasion of the 100thanniversary of IWD, I call on the each of you to show leadership by creating – workplaces which are inclusive of women, workplaces where men and women are equal partners, where they are paid equally, workplaces where harassment and violence have no place, workplaces where those who live with violence can be supported and feel safe.

Just like Ellas grand daughter, we can give dignity back and tell the truth kindly. My quest is to realise a peaceful world, one where your children and mine can thrive irrespective of their gender. Will you join me?

[1]Australian Bureau of Statistics,Average Weekly Earnings, Cat. 6302, cited in Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Agency,Gender Workplace Statistics at a Glance,

[2]Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Agency (2009)Pay, Power and Position: Beyond the 2008 EOWA Australian Census of Women in Leadership, 6, at

Leadership_Census/Pay_Power_Position/Pay_Power_Position_Beyond_the_Census.pdfcited in Australian Human Rights Commission (2009)Gender Equality Blueprint,AHRC, 19.

[3]Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Agency (2010)EOWA Australian Census of Women in Leadership

[4]Australian Institute of Company Directors,Statistics, as at February 2011,

[5]Australian Institute of Company Directors,Statistics, as at February 2011,

[6]Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Agency (2010)EOWA Australian Census of Women in Leadership

[7]Australian Human Rights Commission, (2008)Sexual harassment: Serious business: Results of the 2008 Sexual Harassment National Telephone Survey.

[8]Australian Human Rights Commission, (2008)Sexual harassment: Serious business: Results of the 2008 Sexual Harassment National Telephone Survey.

[9]Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006)Personal Safety, Australia, 2005(Reissue), Catalogue No. 4906.0 (2006), 7, at Note: The ABS defines physical violence to include any incident involving the occurrence, attempt or threat of physical assault. Exact figure is 363,000.

[10]Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006),Personal Safety, Australia, 2005(Reissue), Catalogue No. 4906.0 (2006), unpublished.

[11]Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006),Personal Safety, Australia, 2005(Reissue), Catalogue No. 4906.0 (2006), 10.

[12]Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006),Personal Safety, Australia, 2005(Reissue), Catalogue No. 4906.0 (2006), unpublished.

[13]Access Economics (2004)The Cost of Domestic Violence to the Australian Economy: Part 1, Commonwealth of Australia, vi.

[14]Gooda, M (2010)Social Justice – better outcomes for family violence,prevention

[15]Women with Disabilities Australia (2007)Its Not OK: Its Violence, Rosny Park, WWDA, 30.

[16]Dearden, J & Jones, W (2008) Homicidein Australia: 2006 06 National Homicide Monitoring Program Annual Report, Australian Institute of Criminology, 2.

[17]VicHealth, (2007)VicHealth Partnership to Prevent Domestic Violence,

[18]National Council to Reduce Violence Against Women and their Children, (2009)The Cost of Violence Against Women and their Children, Commonwealth of Australia, 4.

[19]Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006)Personal Safety, Australia, 2005(Reissue), Catalogue No. 4906.0 (2006), 35, at

[20]Moe, A & Bell, M, (2004) Abject economics: the effects of battering and violence on womens work and employability;Violence Against Women, 10:1, 30.

[21]Franz way, S, Zufferey C and Chung, D (2010) Domestic Violence and Multidimensional Factors: Investigating the impact of domestic violence on womens employment, health and housing,Our Work Our Lives National Conference, Darwin, 12-13 August 2010.

[22]Brandwein, R and Filiano, (2000) Toward Real Welfare Reform: The Voices of Battered Women,Affililia, 15:2,224-242.

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Womans Day Magazine Features Groundbreaking Article About Transgender Family

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Womans Day Magazine Features Groundbreaking Article About Transgender Family

Womans Day broke ground recently with an article featuring a Christian mother and her transgender son.

The story, titledThe Son God Gave Me,was published in the October 2014 issue of the lifestyle magazine and focused on Gina Kentopp and her transgender son, Kyle.

Kentopp told Womens Day she reconciled her traditional Christian faith with acceptance of her child after reading the memoir of a gay Christian.

Instead of asking God to change your child, the author suggested, why dont you ask Him to change your heart? she said. It was a revelation: I had never even considered that idea.

Kentopp says she ultimately formed a strong, supportive bond with her son built on a foundation of trust and found an accepting church for her family to attend.

Now that Kyle is in college and thriving, she decided to share her story with the magazine in order to help other families and challenge stereotypes about religion, she told The Huffington Post. While there were some negative comments in response to the article, Kentopp said the majority of the feedback she has received has been beautiful and positive.

Weve wanted to touch on this subject for some time, and when we found Gina, we were so moved by her story that we knew the time was right, Editor-in-Chief Susan Spencer told HuffPost. A devout Christian, Gina came to believe that loving your child and putting him or her first is the most important thing, regardless of ones preconceived notions or personal beliefs.

While we did receive some negative comments online and through letters, we were thrilled to have received mostly positive reader reaction, she added, which reaffirmed our hope that by telling a story through the eyes of someone with whom they have much in common, our readers would be able to embrace a point of view that may not be prevalent in their communities.

Family Circle made a similar move when itfeatured a gay family in its November 2014 issue, the first time a same-sex couple was ever featured since the publication launched in 1932. The magazine received backlash from its readers, but Linda Fears, vice president and editor-in-chief, defended the decision as an honest depiction of the American family life today.

Womans Day Magazine Features Groundbreaking Article About Transgender Family

Jenna Talackova a href= headlines in April 2012/a when she was booted from the Miss Universe Canada pageant. Talackova fought back and ultimately was allowed back into the competition. She spoke with Barbara Walters and said, I feel like the universe, the creator, just put me in this position as an advocate, she continues. If its helping anybody else by sharing my story and with my actions, then I feel great about it.

Senior Editor, Content Strategy, The Huffington Post

Womans Day Magazine Features Groundbreaking Article About Transgender Family

International Womans Day Breakfast – Townsvillle

International Womans Day Breakfast – Townsvillle

The Grand Ballroom Cost: $50.00 p.p. GENDER EQUALITY: Challenges & opportunities in achieving gender equality and the empowerment of rural women & girls Keynote – Speakers -Panel, Discussion,Hot BreakfastLucky oor Prizes Major Prize:MercedesforaWeekend -Mercedes-Benz Townsville 

International Womans Day Breakfast – Townsvillle Townsville Australia @ The Ville Resort-Casino thursday, March 8, 2018 – Events Townsville –

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Womans Day Australia Magazine – Get your Digital Subscription

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Womans Day is Australias number one-selling weekly womens magazine, offering all the latest celebrity gossip and exclusive interviews as well as fascinating real-life reads, mouth-watering recipes, beauty, fashion, food, health and family advice.

In this weeks issue of Womans Day: Biggest Royal feud ever, read more about it inside. Plus top 15 cruises of 2018.

Editor Fiona Connolly on the success of Womans Day

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Editor Fiona Connolly on the success of Womans Day

Womans Day editor Fiona Connolly discusses print successes, competition from New Idea and why Kim K wont be on its cover any time soon

After some hurdles with timing,Mediaweekwas finally able to get hold ofFionaConnolly, the editor of Australias most-read weekly magazineWomans Day.

It was getting a little bit hectic, Connolly said toMediaweekas she apologised for postponing a time set on Thursday, which is the weekly magazines deadline day.

I actually did the cover interview withSamArmytage. I havent done that for quite some time. Having to interview and write while trying to get the rest of the mag off was hectic, she laughed. It was good to get back on the tools so to speak.

In the emma figures for 12 months to December 2015,Womans Dayhas the highest circulation and readership of any weekly title in Australia. The magazine had a readership of over 1.764 million from a circulation of 275,120.

There is something about the magazine that screams engagement, Connolly remarked.

The key to Bauer MediasWomans Daysuccess, Connolly said, is a combination of two things: 1) The mixture of celebrity, real life and lifestyle stories 2) The titles focus on serving its core audience.

I am very focused on catering to our core audience and not skewing too young. A lot of other celebrity titles have lost sight of that, Connolly claimed. [In an attempt] to get the younger audiences, they have ignored their core audience. That for me is women aged 50+.

Womans Dayis a multigenerational magazine that is read by several generations of Australian women but certainly our key demo is women who are 50+.

We break more Australian celebrity stories than any other brand or title. What I see online is a great deal of celebrity content, but there is a huge amount of regurgitation and recycling of stories. Whereas you can guarantee that on Monday morning you will get a handful of truly exclusive stories on theWomans Daywebsite, which will point the readers back to magazine for the full story.

The crossover between its audience online and the magazine in March 2016 was about 18,000 readers, according Roy Morgan. The main driver of traffic to theWomans Daywebsite is its Facebook page, which has just under one million followers. We are literally a week or so off that million fan mark, Connolly stated. Every time I turn around we are closer.

Pacific Magazines weekly titleNew IdeaisWomans Days closest competitor in print.New Ideahas a readership of 1.742 million, according to emma data for 12 months to December 2015. When it comes to online successes,New Ideatakes the lead based on emmas monthly total audience readership report for magazines online. In March 2016,Womans Dayhad a readership of 217,000 whileNew Ideahad 241,000. In terms of social following,New Ideaentered the one million followers club on Facebook in late April.

All of our Facebook fans are very organic. They havent been bought. Our reach on Facebook is also high. It was at 2.3 million the last time I checked, Connolly asserted.

About the close competition fromNew Ideain print, Connolly said: Womans Daysells about 1.8 million more copies over the year thanNew Idea, so [the distance between 1 and 2] is quite significant.

That old saying, imitation is the highest form of flattery, is true. Its a little bit of annoyance that weve got a competitor that will take the successes and ideas that we have here and replicate them.

I certainly dont look over my shoulder. We have keen interest in theNew Ideathat comes out each week to see what they are doing. But that said, the team and I here atWomans Dayhave a very strong vision and we never waver from that regardless of what the opposition is doing.

Speaking about what theWomans Daypoint of difference is in the Australian weekly magazine market, Connolly said: TheWomans Dayreaders are rather conservative. They have a lot of pride in Australia and Australian women. The best cover stars are Australians, Connolly revealed.

KimKardashianis not one of those. Therefore, you wont see Kim Kardashian on the cover ofWomans Day.

Australian actor and comedianRebel Wilsonissued a writ against Bauer Media earlier this month for articles that Wilson claims were defamatory and have had an impact on her career. The two articles were published byWomans Dayon its website and in print in May 2015.Womans Dayclaimed that Wilson had fabricated stories from her childhood and lied about her age, name and background. There were subsequent articles published in other Bauer Media titles.

Bauer Media issued a statement about this, which in part read: Bauer Media has not been served with a writ by representatives of Ms Wilson. If and when it is served, we will take the opportunity to consider our defences.

Entertainment media outlets are often accused of sensationalising events or fabricating stories on their social media pages.

Asked about her response to this criticism, Connolly said: For many decades,Womans Dayhas been celebrating celebrities in good and bad times.We have famously reported on the events that the celebrities sometimes dont want you to report, but there is an insatiable appetite for that.

Putting an issue together with a compelling cover doesnt guarantee that the magazine will be flying off the shelves. There are a lot of other factors that impact on how well an issue sells.

The biggest contributing factor is what the competition is doing. Other factors such as public holidays and the weather can also have an impact on the sales, Connolly said.

Thats why if its raining on a Monday morning whenWomans Dayeditor Fiona Connolly wakes up, she is not particularly pleased.

Anything that can take people out of their usual buying habits can be a problem for us.

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;s Day Magazine

30s Woman and Home Magazine December 1939 Christmas Issue Crafts Short Stories

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